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A Beginner's Guide to Amigurumi

Updated: Jun 21, 2022



What is Amigurumi?

A Guide On How to Make Your Own Amigurumi


If you are a knitter or a crocheter you may be familiar with the word ‘amigurumi’, but what exactly is it?


Amigurumi is the art of crocheting or knitted stuffed toys. The word itself is a combination of two Japanese words, ‘ami’ (), which means “crocheted or knitted”, and ‘nuigurumi’ (ぬいぐるみ), meaning “(sewn) stuffed doll”.


The art of amigurumi became significantly popular in Japan during the 1980s and has been a staple of kawaii culture ever since. With very few resources required to complete most projects, amigurumi is easy to pick up; you only need to know a few simple stitches to create a wide range of projects. An amigurumi craze spread to the Western world in the 2000s and has since become one of the most popular crafts projects ever. You can choose to make amigurumi by knitting or crocheting, though crocheted amigurumi is generally considered the easier option to master.


Things to Consider When Knitting/Crocheting Amigurumi

How to progress from beginner to advanced amigurumi


If you’re a beginner when it comes to amigurumi, we recommend starting on a smaller project that uses a heavier weight yarn, such as 8-ply, and a larger hook size, ideally 3.5mm or 4mm. There are amigurumi pattern designs for almost anything you can think of, from animals and objects, to your favourite pop culture icons. Here are our compilations of our favourite Star Wars amigurumi and dinosaur amigurumi patterns. Most patterns should provide you with details on the size and requirements for completing your project.


Starting your first-ever amigurumi project may seem like a daunting task, but perseverance is key to the arts of knitting and crochet, and amigurumi is no different!


Polyester, wool, or cotton are the most popular choice of materials for stuffing amigurumi projects, but any other material can be used if you have a different preference. Create a tight gauge using smaller hooks and tighter stitches, such as a single crochet or double half crochet, to prevent the stuffing from showing through it.